The Adirondack Review
Mountain Streams

Forget the path or road.
Bushwhack through sage and willows
And walk into the stream.

The thing about a stream is
It knows where it’s going, has a gift
For finding the shortest route.

A path or road can lose its nerve,
Peter out into a thicket or slough, divide
Inscrutably in two. I’ve stood at that place

And weighed the choices, weighed
And checked again, while mist crawled
Over the mountain like sheep.

When the stream divides
Both streamlets are equally sure.
Each wins its own way: the slick of moss,

The fast rush over an edge of rock
And each, if you let it,
Will take you THERE.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GENE WASHINGTON is a professor of English at Utah State University. His fiction, poetry, and criticism have been published in the United States, Canada, and Australia. His plays have been performed in New York City, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and at the University of Australia.
The St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poems
The St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poems
The St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poemsThe St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poemsThe St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poems
The St. Lawrence Book Award for a first collection of short stories or poems